On the Liberal Cult of the Cognitive Elite

On the Liberal Cult of the Cognitive Elite
AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster, File

Way back in 1924, F. Scott Fitzgerald figured out something very shrewd about right-wingers. He discovered, and described, an emerging social type: the reactionary pedant.

It comes in Chapter One of The Great Gatsby, where Fitzgerald introduces his dramatis personae. Our narrator, Nick Carraway, is chatting away aimlessly with his sophisticated cousin Daisy Buchanan and her equally sophisticated friend, Jordan Baker. Embarked upon his second glass of a “corky but rather impressive claret,” Nick remarks that the conversation has grown a bit too recherché for his taste: “You make me feel uncivilized, Daisy. Can't you talk about crops or something?” He “meant nothing in particular by this remark but it was taken up in an unexpected way”—by Daisy's husband, Tom Buchanan, whom Nick had known when both attended Yale.

Read Full Article »
Comment
Show commentsHide Comments

Related Articles