Brent Orrell

Author Archive

  • Nov 24, 2020
    Before the pandemic, remote work in America was a luxury reserved for just 7 percent of the workforce, mostly highly educated and highly paid knowledge workers. Then, in a matter of...
  • Nov 20, 2020
    In the two decades prior to COVID-19, remote work grew steadily but remained a small portion of the U.S. workforce. Then came March 2020, when stay-at-home orders turned the world...
  • Oct 13, 2020
    Careers in science, technology, engineering and math — more commonly referred to as STEM — are widely believed to provide greater job security and career opportunities....
  • Aug 26, 2020
    The archetype of a greedy CEO that looms in the American imagination is a white-shoe knickerbocker type who grew up rich, inherited their role, and sucks the life out of their...
  • Aug 19, 2020
    Were it possible to ask the country, “So, how was your summer?” the only possible answer would be: “Not great. In fact, it was terrible.” Pandemic illness,...
  • Aug 17, 2020
    As the country awaits action on the next round of COVID relief, one population in particular has a great deal to lose during the wait: Native Americans, one of America’s...
  • Jul 15, 2020
    As the pandemic drags on, the economic damage in the US is running deep and the unemployment and workforce systems are struggling to support the millions of newly unemployed workers....
  • Jul 1, 2020
    Before the pandemic, hardly a day went by without hearing about the critical need for businesses to digitally transform their operations. “Adapt or die”, as the saying...
  • Jun 11, 2020
    Our police forces are bloated.But simply reducing budgets without first addressing how police forces are structured and function, is an invitation to even worse outcomes. So instead...
  • Jun 3, 2020
    Republicans in Congress seem intent on ending the federal Pandemic Unemployment Compensation (PUC) program in response to employer complaints that the additional $600 per week makes...
  • May 27, 2020
    Judging by the proliferation of videos showing angry confrontations over the use of masks in public, it appears our ongoing culture wars are making a serious dent in sound public...
  • May 13, 2020
    As the weeks of quarantining have stretched into months, the slow rumblings of reopening the economy have recently turned into a roar. More than half the states have begun taking...
  • May 7, 2020
    Our AEI colleague, Yuval Levin recently published an article in Commentary Magazine exploring how the COVID-19 moment might affect social solidarity. Will it lead to increased...
  • Apr 30, 2020
    It started with my mother. She was the first person I heard express concern about the supplementary COVID-19 unemployment benefits. As a child of the Depression with a high school...
  • Apr 9, 2020
    Much like the pandemic that caused it, the employment situation in the US is changing faster than our systems can track. A booming economy has, almost overnight, transformed into a...
  • Apr 1, 2020
    In the run-up to Senate passage of the $2 trillion COVID-19 relief bill, a number of senators expressed skepticism about the $600 per month unemployment supplement available to all...
  • Mar 24, 2020
    A New York Times article last week examining unofficial state-level reports from only 15 states suggests nearly 630,000 unemployment insurance claims have been filed over the past...
  • Feb 26, 2020
    If my Twitter feed offers a reliable picture, like many people watching the 2020 Democratic presidential debate Wednesday night, I was both perplexed and disappointed by Mayor...
  • Feb 20, 2020
    In their new paper, Competing with Robots, Daron Acemoglu (MIT), Pascual Restrepo (Boston University), and Claire LeLarge (University of Paris) survey the impact of robotics on...
  • Feb 13, 2020
    In an age of partisan polarization, any area of bipartisan agreement is a welcome respite. For many years, policymakers across the aisle have found common ground in an understanding...
  • Jan 21, 2020
    Ever since Anne Case and Angus Deaton of Princeton University coined the term “deaths of despair” in their 2015 study on rising mortality rates among working class...
  • Jan 14, 2020
    Harvard’s David Deming and Kadeem Noray have updated their work on the economic returns to education in science, technology, engineering and math with a new study, STEM Careers...